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Current Articles

» Pregnancy and Chiropractic
» Non-Surgical Spinal Decompression
» Chiropractic Care as First Choice in Pain Management
» Back Surgery May Backfire on Patients in Pain
» Reducing Risk of Recurring Low Back Pain for Office Workers
» New Study Finds Obese Seniors Can Improve Disability with Diet and Exercise
» Even Bad Cholesterol in the Moderate Range Can Spell Early Death

Pregnancy and Chiropractic

Pregnancy and Chiropractic

Chiropractic care has typically included the care of pregnant patients to assure the patient a comfortable pregnancy and to help facilitate an uncomplicated labor and delivery. Clinical studies on chiropractic care during pregnancy found relief from back pain during pregnancy in 84% of cases. Chiropractic evaluation and treatment during pregnancy may be considered a safe and effective means of treating common musculoskeletal symptoms that affect pregnant patients.

For more information, please visit: www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

 

 

 

 

Author: Cara L. Borggren DC
Source: Journal of Chirporactic Medicine
Copyright: Elsevier Inc. 2017


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Non-Surgical Spinal Decompression

Non-Surgical Spinal Decompression

If you have lasting back pain and other related symptoms, you know how disruptive to your life it can be. You may be unable to think of little else except finding relief. Some people turn to spinal decompression therapy -- either surgical or nonsurgical. Here's what you need to know to help decide whether it might be right for you.


What Is Nonsurgical Spinal Decompression?

Nonsurgical spinal decompression is a type of motorized traction that may help relieve back pain. Spinal decompression works by gently stretching the spine. That changes the force and position of the spine. This change takes pressure off the spinal disks, which are gel-like cushions between the bones in your spine, by creating negative pressure in the disc. As a result, bulging or herniated disks may retract, taking pressure off nerves and other structures in your spine. This in turn, helps promote movement of water, oxygen, and nutrient-rich fluids into the disks so they can heal.

For more information, please visit: www.webmd.com
Nutrition for the disk: Disk Flex

 

Author: WebMD
Source: www.webmd.com
Copyright: WebMD, LLC. 2005


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Chiropractic Care as First Choice in Pain Management

Chiropractic Care as First Choice in Pain Management

Arlington, Va.— During National Chiropractic Health Month (NCHM) in October, the American Chiropractic Association (ACA) will build on its ongoing efforts to raise awareness of the value of a conservative approach to pain management in the face of the U.S. opioid epidemic with the theme and hashtag #Chiropractic1st.
 
"Chiropractic services are an important first line of defense against pain and, in some cases, can lessen a patient's reliance on addictive painkillers or prevent their use altogether," said ACA President David Herd, DC. "It makes sense to exhaust conservative forms of treatment such as chiropractic before moving on to riskier, potentially addictive pain medications."
 
Statistics show that as many as one in four patients who receive prescription opioids long-term for non-cancer pain in primary care settings struggles with addiction. In addition, every day more than 1,000 people are treated in the emergency room for misusing prescription opioids.

For more information, please visit:https://www.acatoday.org

 

Author: ACA Authors
Source: www.acatoday.org
Copyright: Copyright American Chiropractic Association 2016


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Back Surgery May Backfire on Patients in Pain

Author: Linda Carroll
Source: www.nbcnews.com
Copyright: NBC News 2010


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Reducing Risk of Recurring Low Back Pain for Office Workers

Are you an office worker who has experienced low back pain in the past?  If so, you are at a significantly greater risk of future low back pain.  According to a one-year study of 669 healthy office workers, people who had previous episodes of low back pain were more likely to experience low back pain again.  The amount of recurring low back pain was also influenced by the frequency of work rest breaks as well as psychological stresses.  This study gives some clues as to how to avoid getting low back pain while at the office.

Here are some tips:

  • Take Frequent Desk Breaks. We are not talking about taking advantage of your employer and “shirking off” during the day for long periods of time. A quick break could simply be to stand up for a minute or two and stretch before returning to your work.
  • Reduce Workplace Stress. While some of this is out of your control, you can take some positive steps to reduce workplace stress. Speak up and ask for an extended deadline if the task needs it. Try to work out problems with coworkers respectfully and proactively.
  • Chiropractic Care. A qualified chiropractor can help you reduce low back pain when it happens and prevent it. Contact our office today for a no commitment consultation!

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: JMPT. June 2018 Volume 41, Issue 5, Pages 405–412
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2019


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New Study Finds Obese Seniors Can Improve Disability with Diet and Exercise

According to a new U.S. study, seniors age 65-79 may be able to improve their disability and lessen fatigue if they start exercising more.  Plus, if they cut calories, they may achieve overall improved health.  Researchers at Wake Forest School of Medicine in North Carolina conducted the study. The experiment involved 180 obese senior adults from the age of 65 to 79 years-old.  Each participant was randomly given a 20-week task: Regular aerobic activity, or regular aerobic activity combined with cutting calories.  All 180 seniors focused on treadmill exercises at least 4 days per week. However, the group assigned to cut calories also were instructed to eat at least 250-600 fewer calories per day, as well.  According to the study, the group who exercised and cut calories was able to increase their exercise capacity (the body’s ability to supply oxygen to muscles during longer exercise sessions) by 14-16%.  Meanwhile, the seniors who only focused on aerobic exercise increased their exercise capacity by nearly 8%.  The researchers concluded, in general, people who cut a moderate amount of calories from their diets and complete regular aerobic workouts will see good results.  You don’t have to slash calories drastically, because this is difficult to keep up.  Best of all, anyone at any stage of life, even people who are both obese and elderly, will see health benefits from getting active and eating less.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: The Journals of Gerontology Series B, online July 5, 2018.
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2019


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Even Bad Cholesterol in the Moderate Range Can Spell Early Death

Adults who don't keep their "bad cholesterol" numbers at bay, who are otherwise healthy, are far likelier to die early deaths from cardiovascular issues than those who keep their cholesterol in the "good" range.  A recent study from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center looked at data from over 36,000 patients with zero past incidences of diabetes or heart disease, including a low risk for heart attacks and strokes.  However, these patients had some level of LDL-C ("bad cholesterol" that can build up in your blood vessels), although it was low enough not to warrant prescription cholesterol medication, called statins.  The follow-up period for the study was around 27 years. During this time, over 1,000 people died from cardiovascular disease, while nearly 600 died from heart disease.  According to the study, the higher the person's LDL-C levels (ranging from 100 to 190 mg/DL), the higher their risk of dying from cardiovascular disease or complications.  Usually, physicians don't prescribe statins unless the patient's cholesterol level reaches a threshold of 190 mg/DL.  This means even moderate levels of LDL-C can put you at risk.  Researchers say that the biggest takeaway from the study data is that a low risk for 10-year cardiovascular events does not mean the risk posed by higher LDL-C levels is wiped out.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: Circulation, online August 20, 2018.
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2019


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